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World’s Largest Fishing Vessel Is Shut Down

The Damanzaihao

World’s Largest Fishing Vessel Is Shut Down

Article by V-Dog Blog

Thanks to marine wildlife conservation group Sea Shepherd, the world’s largest fish factory ship, the Damanzaihao, was arrested and seized last week. Capable of killing 547,000 tons of fish per year, the blacklisted vessel is subject to a federal criminal investigation. The ship is currently prohibited from leaving its port in Peru.

The Damanzaihao’s illegal fishing acts had previously led to a multi-million dollar fine issued by the Peruvian Ministry of Production in 2016. The vessel has also been accused of pollution through illegal discharge of waste.

Sea Shepherd is gathering information to assist the government and help put an end to illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing. The organization has highlighted data indicating that up to 26 million tons of fish and seafood are caught illegally every year.

“IUU fishing often occurs in marine protected areas and effects non-target species including sharks, dolphins, rays, Bryde’s whales, whale sharks, and turtles. These animals often become trapped in illegal fishing nets, die, and are discarded.”

In addition to marine conservation, Sea Shepherd maintains an animal rights focus. All of the food served on Sea Shepherd vessels is vegan.

“Peru is taking a strong stance in its efforts to bring the Damanzaihao to justice,” said Sea Shepherd. “Under the Peruvian Penal Code, successful conviction carries a penalty of three to five years of incarceration. Sea Shepherd applauds Peru’s commitment to combating IUU fishing and continues to provide support to Peru to help bring an end to the rampant over-exploitation of the oceans.”

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Vegan Food Ideas For Fussy Toddlers

Fussy Toddler

Vegan Food Ideas For Fussy Toddlers

Article by Raise Vegan

Do you have a fussy toddler? Need some inspiration for your little picky eater?

Here’s a list of foods that even the fussiest of toddlers can’t ignore!

Navel Oranges

They’re an easy, sweet way to start the day or end a meal, especially in the winter. They have a lot of vitamin C and the aroma is delightful. Slice it up or cut into bite sized chunks for your little to enjoy!

Dried Blueberries

Portable, delicious and nutritious! Dried fruit packs up to 5x the amount of iron as regular fruit, so it’s a great way to sneak in some nutrients into your toddler’s diet. My neighbor introduced me to these and they’ve been a staple in our house ever since!

Dates With Peanut Butter

Dates are nature’s candy, without the sugar crash and upset stomach. My daughter loves to dip fresh medjool dates into organic peanut butter. You can even make vegan turtles by layering a date with peanut butter and pecans, then drizzling melted dairy-free chocolate on top with a pinch of crushed pink himalayan salt. Pop in the freezer for 10 minutes and enjoy!

Smoothies

They’re incredibly simple and nutritious. When I make my own at home, I like to use frozen blueberries and frozen dark cherries as a base. Then I add kale or spinach, and squeeze fresh citrus juice on top. I sometimes use coconut water or just plain water to make it more liquidy. I always throw in hemp hearts, ground flaxseed and chia seeds for healthy omega-3 fats. If I have fresh turmeric or ginger I’ll add that, too (with a tiny pinch of black pepper to make the turmeric 2,000x more bioavailable). If we’re traveling or out of town, Naked Juices are available at most gas stations and are our favorite go-to snack.

Guacamole

My daughter’s first food was mashed avocado, and it’s been one food she’s loved since the beginning. You can simply mash it up with a little salt, pepper, garlic salt and lime juice, or let them eat it plain! Avocado is full of healthy fats that help with brain development, so we try to eat it at least once a day.

Hummus

My daughter could eat an entire container of hummus in one sitting (and let’s be honest; so could I!) It’s amazing on crackers or bread, with baked veggies and homemade french fries. I prefer to make my own hummus at home — it takes five minutes to whip up in the food processor and lasts in the fridge for a few days. Because it’s made with chickpeas and tahini (ground up sesame seeds), it’s bursting with nutrients like iron, zinc and B6, as well as almost 20 essential amino acids!

Lentil Soup

Our family eats lentil soup about twice a week. It’s easy to whip up for a quick lunch and super affordable. We love Amy’s brand soups especially. It’s great with a baked potato or leftover brown rice, a dollop of vegan sour cream, a sprinkle of nutritional yeast and a dash of hot sauce!

Fried Rice

Hands down, my vegan toddler’s favorite food is fried mushrooms and green peas. Throw those in with some brown rice, carrots, Bragg’s liquid aminos and sauteed kale and you’ve got yourself a wholesome lunch or dinner!

Tempeh Tacos

My daughter loves spicy and interesting flavors, so tempeh tacos are a fan favorite. Frying up tempeh with minced garlic and onions and taco seasoning is simple and delicious! We sometimes fry up russet potatoes, refried beans, make fresh salsa, guacamole and cashew nacho “cheese” to top them off! We could eat vegan tacos every day!

Blueberry Pancakes

Not only are pancakes hearty and comforting, but I pack them full of ground flax seeds and chia seeds without anyone noticing! I follow a recipe from the minimalistbaker.com (my all time favorite recipe website). They’re my favorite weekend treat and even better with some tofu scramble with veggies on the side

 

I hope this gives you some ideas to try with your picky eater! It helps to add fun flavors and eat the same foods as our kids. If you’re not eating broccoli, they probably won’t be interested in eating it either! It’s important to be a positive example for our children and set them up to enjoy healthy and delicious foods early in life.

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Impossible Foods Raises $114 Million To Expand Into International Markets

Impossible Foods

Impossible Foods Raises $114 Million To Expand Into International Markets

Food-Tech startup Impossible Foods has secured $114 million dollars investment to help the company expand their products across international markets.

The company, which was founded in 2011 by Stanford biochemistry professor and former pediatrician Dr. Patrick O. Brown, develops plant-based meat and dairy products made without animals. Its flagship product is the Impossible Burger, which is currently only available in  selected restaurants and sporting venues across the US.

The new cash injection takes total investments to nearly $400 million including approximately $214 million in the past 18 months. The company’s newest investors include Temasek and Sailing Capital. Open Philanthropy Project, Temasek, Bill Gates and Horizons Ventures have invested in multiple rounds of funding. Early investors include Google Ventures, UBS and Viking Global Investors.

Impossible Burger

Founder and CEO, Patrick Brown, commented in a press release“Our world-class investors enable us to ramp up rapidly and accomplish our urgent mission. We are proud of the progress we’ve made — but frankly, there are still millions of restaurants and billions of people who want meat. We won’t stop until the global food system is truly sustainable.”

According to Brown, the demand for the Impossible Burger is still outpacing production. Brown plans to add an additional shift at the company’s Oakland, Calif. facility to increase supply. In regards to its Asia debut, Brown assured that the move is strategic. Asia is responsible for 44% of the global demand for meat, and this demand is growing faster than any other region. Brown hopes to satisfy this meaty craving with the plant-based Impossible Burger to dramatically reduce the environmental and ethical consequences of eating animals.

The Impossible Burger is unlike many veggie burgers out there. Its unique plant-based formula replicates the look, taste, texture, and even smell of animal meat – so much so, often the most dedicated carnivores struggle to tell the difference.

Source: Live Kindly

 

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Vegan Red Velvet Cake-Pops

Vegan Red Velvet Cake-Pops

Vegan Red Velvet Cake-Pops

Recipe by, One Green Planet

You’d never guess that these little bites of decadence are grain-free! In this recipe, Medjool dates are blended with almond and coconut flour to create rich little bites of red velvet cake. The chocolate coating is entirely optional, but it takes everything to the next level.

Ingredients: 

1 small roasted beet (or cut a large one in half)
1/4 cup coconut flour
1/4 cup almond flour
1/4 cup unsweetened shredded coconut
4 soft pitted Medjool dates
1 tablespoon full-fat coconut milk, or other non-dairy milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 tablespoons vegan homemade mini chocolate chips
1/2 85% dark chocolate bar, roughly chopped
10 cake pop sticks

Instructions:

  1. Prep a baking sheet or large cutting board with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. In a food processor, combine all ingredients from beet to vanilla and pulse until smooth. It should resemble red velvet cookie dough.
  3. If adding chocolate chips, remove the blade from the processor, and fold in the chocolate chips with a spatula. Scoop out cookie dough using a scoop or tablespoon, and roll into your hand to form a ball and set on parchment paper. Place cake bites in the refrigerator.
  4. Heat a saucepan with a few inches of water over high heat and add chocolate to a heatproof bowl.
  5. Place the bowl of chocolate over the saucepan and melt chocolate, stirring occasionally.
  6. Remove cake bites from the refrigerator and insert one cake pop stick into each one. Carefully dip each cake pop into the melted chocolate mixture and place back on the parchment paper.
  7. Place in the refrigerator for the chocolate to set for about 15-20 minutes. Remove and serve in a jar, if desired.

Share your creations with us on facebook.com/plantbasedlifeSA/

Happy healthy cooking!

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Friends Not Food! Dogs and their Farm Animal Besties

Dog & Cow

Dogs are omnivores (not carnivores) and can thrive on a nutritionally balanced animal-free diet. Which is good news, since pigs, cows, chickens, and goats are much more fun as friends than they are as dinner.

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Still think dogs are meant to eat other animals? Click here for more info!

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First All-Vegan Neighborhood Forms in Downtown Toronto

Toronto

First All-Vegan Neighborhood Forms in Downtown Toronto

An article by Anna Starostinetskaya, VegNews

One city block in downtown Toronto will be home to a number of vegan businesses by the end of the year, making it a tourist destination for the cruelty-free crowd.

The Parkdale neighborhood of downtown Toronto is now officially called “Vegandale.” The initiative was launched by The 5700 group—a collaboration between local vegan businesses that operate on the same block, including Los Angeles import Doomie’s, retail shop The Imperative, and recently opened Mythology Diner. “This premiere destination for the vegan and vegan curious is the only one of it’s kind, promoting a world where animal exploitation is a thing of the past,” the group’s newly launched website stated. “With our roots in abolitionism, our unapologetic messaging is the connection between each project we touch.” The group also hosts the annual Vegandale Food Drink Festival (formerly Vegan Food & Drink Festival), which will expand to its first event in Houston in June. “We’re ready to move one step closer to world vegan domination with our upcoming festival season,” The 5700 owner Hellenic Vincent De Paul said. “Vegandale couldn’t be contained to just one city block, so we’re packing up and taking our vegan utopia on the road.” By the end of 2018, the group plans to open several additional vegan businesses in Vegandale, including the Vegandale Bracitorium, Prohibition Pie, and Not Your Mother (NYM).

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Vegan Cinnamon Rolls

Vegan Cinnamon Rolls

Vegan Cinnamon Rolls

Recipe by, Oh She Glows

Fluffy cinnamon rolls topped with a sweet and tangy cream cheese frosting; these are great to whip up for special occasions or laid-back weekend mornings. There are quite a few steps, but don’t panic! I promise, as long as you read everything over before you begin, you’ll be fine—they’re actually quite easy to make. Even though this recipe technically requires about 2 hours and 45 minutes total time, only 30 to 40 minutes of that are active. The remainder is rest and bake time, during which I encourage you to kick up your feet and relax! See my tips below for how to make these the night before, too.

Ingredients:

For the yeast:

1/2 cup (125 mL) warm water
1 teaspoon (5 g) sugar
1 packet (8 g) quick-rise instant dry yeast

For the dough:

2 1/2 cups + 3 tablespoons (430 g) all-purpose white flour, plus more for kneading
1/3 cup (67 g) vegan butter
1/2 cup (125 mL) unsweetened almond milk
1/3 cup (73 g) cane sugar
1 teaspoon (6 g) fine sea salt

For the cinnamon sugar filling:

1/2 cup (110 g) cane sugar
1 1/2 tablespoons (10 g) cinnamon
1/4 cup (50 g) vegan butter, melted
For the pan sauce and frosting:
1/4 cup (50 g) vegan butter, melted
2 1/2 tablespoons (25 g) unpacked brown sugar or cane sugar

Instructions:

  1. Set aside a 9- by 13-inch casserole dish.
  2. For the yeast: In a small bowl, add the warm water. Make sure it’s not too hot; it should feel like warm bath water (approximately 110°F/45°C). Stir in the sugar until mostly dissolved. Now, stir in the yeast until dissolved. Set aside for about 6 to 7 minutes so the yeast can activate (it’ll look foamy when ready).
  3. For the dough: Flour a working surface for later. Add 2 cups of flour into a large mixing bowl.
  4. Melt 1/3 cup butter in a small saucepan over low heat. Remove the pot from the burner and stir in the almond milk, 1/3 cup sugar, and salt. The mixture should be lukewarm—if it’s any hotter let it cool off for a minute. Stir in all of the yeast mixture until just combined.
  5. Pour the wet yeast mixture over the flour and stir with a large wooden spoon. Stop mixing once all of the flour is incorporated and it looks a bit like muffin batter, about 15 seconds.
  6. Add in the remaining 1/2 cup and 3 tablespoons flour. Mix with a spoon for several seconds. Lightly oil your hands and roughly knead the mixture until it comes together into a shaggy, sticky dough. It’ll probably stick to your fingers (even with the oil), but that’s normal. Turn the dough out onto the floured surface.
  7. Knead the dough for about 3 to 4 minutes until it’s no longer sticky to the touch; it should be smooth and elastic. While kneading, sprinkle on a small handful of flour whenever the dough becomes sticky to the touch. Don’t be afraid to add some flour; I probably use between 1/2 and 3/4 cup while kneading. Shape the dough into a ball.
  8. Wash out the mixing bowl and dry it. Oil the bowl (I love to use a spray oil for ease) and place the ball of dough inside. Flip the dough around so it gets lightly coated in the oil. Tightly cover the bowl with plastic wrap and place it in the oven with the light on (or simply in a warm, draft-free area). Let the dough rise for 60 minutes.
  9. Meanwhile, make the cinnamon sugar filling. In a small bowl, mix 1/2 cup sugar and the cinnamon and set aside.
  10. Make the pan sauce: In a small pot, melt 1/2 cup butter (you can use the unwashed pot from before). Remove half of the melted butter (eyeballing it is fine) and put it in another small bowl (this will be spread onto the rolled-out dough before adding the cinnamon sugar). With the scant 1/4 cup melted butter remaining in the pot, stir in the 2 1/2 tablespoons of brown sugar until combined (this is the pan sauce). Pour the pan sauce into a 9- by 13-inch casserole dish and spread it out.
  11. After the first dough rise, re-flour your working surface and grab a rolling pin. Roll the dough into a large rectangle, approximately 20 by 14 inches.
  12. With a pastry brush, spread the remaining melted butter onto the dough, covering the entire surface. Sprinkle on all of the cinnamon sugar filling, leaving a 1/2 inch around the edges without any sugar.
  13. Grab the end of the dough (short side of rectangle) and roll it up, rolling as tightly as possible. Place it seam-side down once it’s rolled up. Use a serrated knife to slice 1 1/2 inch–thick rolls. You should have 10 to 12.
  14. Grab your cut rolls and place into the prepared pan, cut-side down, a few inches apart from one another. Cover the pan with plastic wrap, place into the oven with the light on, and allow them to rise for 45 minutes.
  15. Meanwhile, prepare the Vegan Cream Cheese Frosting.
  16. After the second rise, remove the rolls from the oven and preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C).
  17. Remove the plastic wrap. Bake the rolls for 23 to 26 minutes at 350°F (180°C), until lightly golden in a few spots. Remove from oven and allow the rolls to cool for about 10 minutes.
  18. Frost the rolls with the cream cheese frosting. Slide a butter knife around each cinnamon roll and lift it out. (Alternatively, you can pop them out first and frost each roll individually.) Serve immediately and enjoy!
  19. If you have leftovers, you can wrap them up and chill them in the fridge for up to 48 hours. I like to reheat unfrosted rolls in the oven on a baking sheet for 5 minutes at 350°F (180°C). The oven returns them to their amazing gooey-soft state! Alternatively, you can freeze the cooled unfrosted rolls (wrap them in a layer of plastic wrap, followed by tinfoil) for a week or two. To reheat, simply unwrap and pop them frozen onto a baking sheet and into the oven for 10 to 12 minutes at 350°F (180°C) until warmed throughout. The edges get a bit crispy, and it’s oh so good!

Tips:

Want cinnamon rolls prepped for breakfast the next day? Simply follow the recipe until you complete the second rise. Place the wrapped dish in the fridge overnight. In the morning, remove the dish from the fridge and let the rolls sit in the oven with the light on for about 20 minutes. After that, remove the dish from the oven and preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Remove the plastic wrap, and bake as directed. They can be prepped up to 18 hours in advance. Just be sure to cover the dish tightly with plastic wrap while in the fridge.

This recipe is great with any dessert topping. Check out our amazing range of delicious vegan dessert toppings!

natures charm

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Top 10 Reasons Dog Parents Choose Vegan Dog Food

Vegan Dog Owner

Top 10 Reasons Dog Parents Choose Vegan Dog Food

Source: V-dog Blog

Not all people adopt a vegan lifestyle for the same reasons, and not all dog parents transition their canine companions to a plant-based diet for the same reasons either. Here are the top ten reasons people introduce vegan dog food to their four-legged friends!

#1 Health

A vegan diet can work wonders for a dog’s health. Dogs are omnivores (not obligate carnivores), and they can thrive on a vegan diet just like humans can. Unlike wolves, dogs produce abundant amylase, an enzyme used to digest starch in the small intestine, and as a result, dogs can easily break down fruits and veggies for energy and nutrients. So feed your fur babies some bananas for potassium. Or give them some blueberries high in antioxidants to prevent cell damage. Swap out the bone for a stalk of broccoli that’s high in fiber and vitamin C, and watch your dog reach new energy levels and thrive.

#2 Allergies

Food allergies are tough for dogs (and heartbreaking for us), and many dogs suffer from itchy skin, hot spots, infection, diarrhea, and vomiting, all because of the food we’ve chosen for them. Common allergens include beef, chicken, lamb, fish, rabbit, lamb, wheat, corn, and soy, and as you can see, animal products are at the top of the list. After all, dogs didn’t evolve to hunt cows and fish. Vegan diets tend to be hypoallergenic, allowing dogs with serious food allergies to finally stop scratching and licking.

#3 Safety

Do you know what’s in your dog’s food? To keep costs low, most kibble on the market today actually comes from diseased, disabled, dying, or dead animals (known as 4-D). Not to mention the fact that meat in the United States is often contaminated with feces, blood, and other bodily fluids, which can grossly affect the health and happiness of your dog. The FDA states, “This meat may present a potential health hazard to the animals that consume it and to the people who handle it.”

#4 Weight

One in three dogs in the United States is overweight or obese, and more than a dozen serious diseases have been linked to pets with excess weight. Most vets will tell you that exercise and a healthy diet (and the frequency of feeding) are the keys to managing your dog’s weight, and switching your four-legged friend to a plant-based diet can make all the difference in managing their weight. Plenty of nutritious fruits and veggies make for delicious, low-calorie treats too.

#5 Ethics

We can easily prevent animal suffering by avoiding meat, eggs, and dairy products, and the same goes for our companion animals. Billions of pigs, cows, chickens, and other animals are slaughtered and exploited every year, but we can choose not to contribute to the industries that abuse the rights of animals to make a profit. By purchasing cruelty-free dog food, we’re protecting countless animals who can’t defend or speak up for themselves.

#6 Sustainability

Animal agriculture is not sustainable—not for humans and not for dogs. Human populations are growing, and meat production can’t possibly keep pace. According to the UN, 26% of the earth’s terrestrial surface is used for livestock grazing, and on top of that one-third of the planet’s arable land is occupied by livestock feed crops. Switching our dogs to plant-based supports a much more sustainable food system.

#7 Water

It requires almost 2,500 gallons of water to produce one pound of meat, but only 25 gallons of water to produce one pound of grain. Feeding your dog a vegan diet conserves an incredible amount of water and other valuable resources.

#8 World hunger

Consuming animal products hurts everyone, including humans. If the land used to grow feed for livestock was instead devoted to growing crops directly for us and our pets, there’d be much more food available to feed the hungry. Your dog’s diet can make a difference in the world just like yours can.

#9 Pollution

Meat production is unbelievably damaging to our environment. Waste ponds rupture and flood, contaminating local water supplies. Methane gas pollutes the air and contributes to climate change. To make space for more livestock, land is cleared of the trees that would otherwise filter carbon out of the atmosphere, displacing ecosystems. The meat and dairy industries are by far the biggest contributors to climate change, and adopting a vegan diet for you and your dog is the most meaningful way you can serve and protect the environment.

#10 Connection

No one can deny the bond you and your furry companion share, and now you can share veganism too by living a cruelty-free lifestyle together. With your plate and their dish full of nutritious plant-based foods, you can curl up under the covers and binge-watch Netflix knowing that you’re doing what’s best for the planet, your health, and the animals. That’s the dream.

If you’re ready to switch your fur-babies over to a vegan diet, check out our range of vegan pet-foods: Shop For Pets

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Vegan Coconut Macadamia Fudge

Vegan Coconut Macadamia Fudge

Recipe by: Bakepedia

This vegan fudge recipe is absolutely to die for. Made from one of our newly sourced products, Nature’s Source Condensed Milk , it is mind-blowingly creamy and super easy to make.

Coconut Condensed Milk

Nature’s Charm Coconut Condensed Milk  is a naturally dairy free alternative for those who love the taste of sweetened condensed milk. It is also lactose free, gluten-free, vegan and trans-fat free.

 

egan Coconut Macadamia Fudge

 

Ingredients:

1½ cups of sweetened flaked coconut

1½ cups of lightly toasted macadamias

2 pounds of bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, finely chopped

4 tablespoons of vegan “butter” or margarine, cut into pieces

2 cans of Nature’s Charm Sweetened Condensed Coconut Milk

Instructions: 

  1. Line the inside of a 9X13-inch pan with aluminum foil or parchment paper; coat with nonstick spray and set aside.
  2. Toss the coconut and macadamias together; set aside 1 cup of the mixture.
  3. Melt chocolate and margarine in double boiler or microwave, stirring until smooth. Remove from heat and stir in condensed coconut milk, and larger amount of coconut and macadamias until combined.
  4. Quickly scrape fudge into prepared pan. Use rubber spatula or your fingers to coax fudge into corners and into an even layer. Sprinkle reserved coconut and macadamias on top, gently pressing into surface elf fudge. Refrigerate 2 hours or until firm enough to cut. Cut into 40 squares (8X5). Refrigerate in airtight container in single layers separated by waxed or parchment paper for up to 2 weeks. Serve at room temperature.

Share your creations with us on facebook.com/plantbasedlifeSA/

Happy healthy cooking!

 

 

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Enchilada Lasagna

Enchilada Lasagna

Enchilada Lasagna

Turn a simple weeknight dinner into a FIESTA with this delicious enchilada lasagna recipe by The Buddhist Chef.  Basically it’s an enchilada layered up like a lasagna, then baked until bubbly and delicious!! Quick and easy to make using simple ingredients that you are sure to have in the pantry.

We recommend you top it off with some delicious Violife dairy free pizza cheese to make it that all much more satisfying!

 

Ingredients: 

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 chopped onion

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 tablespoon chili powder

1 can diced tomatoes

2 tablespoons agave nector

1 cup canned red kidney beans

4 – 5 Large corn tortillas

Ingredients: 

  1. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C)
  2. In a medium saucepan, heat oil over medium-high heat and sauté onion for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  3. Add salt, cumin, chili powder, tomatoes, maple syrup, and kidney beans.
  4. Bring to a boil and simmer 30 minutes, or until thickened. (The sauce can be made in advance and frozen.)
  5. Spread 1/2 cup (125 mL) sauce at the bottom of a square 9-in. (23-cm) baking dish.
  6. Cover with a layer of tortillas.
  7. Repeat sauce and tortilla layers up to 4 times, depending on the desired thickness.
  8. Bake for 30 minutes or until golden brown.

Share your creations with us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/plantbasedlifeSA/

Happy healthy cooking!